Lead found in 20% of baby food, study says

A new study shows that low levels of lead have been detected in baby food.

The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) said it found lead in 20 percent of the 2,164 baby food and juice samples tested. EDF is calling their findings a hidden health threat, and says the FDA “can and must do better.”

The analysis covered 11 years of FDA data on baby food. Fruit juices and vegetables were among the worst offenders, with lead found in 89 percent of grape juices, 55 percent of apple juices, 86 percent of sweet potato samples, and 43 percent of carrot samples. No specific brands were mentioned.

Teething biscuits also tested positive for lead.

No safe level of lead in blood has been identified.

According to the EDF, “In children, even very low blood lead levels can cause behavioral problems and lower IQ. Protecting children’s ability to learn and thrive demands that we find effective ways to reduce exposures to lead from all sources.”

Click here to read the full study.

Up Next:


Up Next

  • Lead found in 20% of baby food, study says
  • $50-million sought to tackle opioid epidemic
  • Energy drinks cause new father's skull to collapse, loses part of his brain
  • President Trump looks to boost lower-premium health insurance plans with executive order
  • Can you recognize the signs of opioid addiction?
  • Finding new ways to fight the opioid crisis
  • Two-drug cancer treatment shows promise
  • Judge orders Michigan mom 7 days in jail for not vaccinating her son
  • Ground turkey recalled after metal shavings found in package
  • Flu shots available for free