WATCH: Is your child "catching" stress at school?

- School's out and teachers are hopefully getting a much needed break. Though very rewarding, teaching can be a frustrating profession. But a new study from The University of British Columbia is the first to show that burnout and stress is "contagious" to the students.

Researchers collected saliva samples from over 400 elementary school students and tested the levels of cortisol- an indicator of stress. Cortisol was highest in students whose teachers were the most emotionally exhausted. So if your kid's teacher is at the end of their rope, your kid is feeling it on a biological level.

If stress is contagious among teachers and students in the classroom, imagine what it means for managers and employees in a work environment.

When stress becomes chronic, it can contribute to problems like headaches, high blood pressure, diabetes, skin conditions, asthma, arthritis, depression, and anxiety.

Are you “catching” those things at your office?

The Mayo Clinic has some proven stress busters for teachers, students, and YOU: Regular physical activity, of course. But also relaxation techniques like deep breathing, getting a massage, socializing with friends, and reading or listening to music.

And if you want to get more creative, Kate Beckinsale recently made headlines for how she alleviates stress: putting on a two-person fancy-dress horse costume. We already know that real laughter is pretty contagious- and the best medicine.

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