WATCH: Butter lovers rejoice! It's back!

- A major study from Tufts University found that butter consumption had "no significant association" with any type of cardiovascular disease- including coronary heart disease and stroke. Researchers wouldn't go as far as calling it a health food, but a tablespoon serving a day officially won't kill you. It's neither good nor bad. But if you've been avoiding the golden, creamy, meltable treat- that may be all you need to hear. Why the change of heart, nutritional experts?

In addition to mounting evidence that a low-fat diet isn't the way to go for optimal health- and could actually be doing more harm than good- the researchers took a new approach to how they determine if a food is healthy. Instead of looking just at “ingredients”-  like saturated fats- they analyzed the actual food that people eat. And the food "butter" wasn't causing problems.

According to the paper, "a major focus on eating more or less butter, by itself, may not be linked to large differences in mortality, cardiovascular disease or diabetes."

Researchers suggested that maybe butter had been demonized because of the unhealthy things it was being eaten with-  like sugar and refined starches. So spread a little on your whole wheat toast, dress up your vegetables, or drizzle it over your lobster. Enjoy a little butter. Ain't nothing like the real thing.

 

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