Mobile Passport now available to TIA travelers

- Airport officials say a new app will make the customs process for international travelers a whole lot easier.

Instead of filling out a paper customs form, passengers can now scan their passports and answer customs questions through the Mobile Passport app. Once on the ground, passengers can send the information to customs officials before even stepping foot in the airport. Once it's in, passengers receive a barcode to scan, like a mobile ticket, at mobile passport control kiosks.

The app allows users to skip the traditional lines, slashing wait times.

"The average wait time for travelers using the Mobile Passport Control is 21.6 seconds," said U.S. Customs and Borders acting port director Maria Contera.

The app is also expected to make the screening process more efficient and effective for customs agents.

"They will have the mobile app that will provide the information to our officers here on the ground a little bit earlier so they can focus on things that may not match up," said U.S. Representative (D-FL) Kathy Castor.
The same customs rules and regulations will still apply, but unless flagged for further inspections: that's it.
The app works on both android and iPhone. It can already be used at Tampa International Airport, as well as airports in Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Fort Lauderdale, Miami, Minneapolis, New York (JFK), Newark, Orlando, Raleigh, San Francisco, San Jose, Seattle and Washington (Dulles).
 

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