No bond reduction for hit-and-run suspect

- Police say she hit and killed a tow truck driver on the Howard Frankland Bridge and kept going.  Now, Allison Huffman wants a judge to cut her a break and let her out of jail.

Huffman was in court this morning so the judge could get an update on her case.  But in the letter sent to the judge, she said she needs to take her mom to doctor's appointments and help her move to a new house.

She also says he needs to help her mom with her taxes and she needs to do her own taxes, too.

Huffman told the judge she has been studying to be a hearing specialist but needs to get out jail to take the state board exam.

"In the past, in younger years, I have made mistakes and learned from them," she wrote.  "I want you to know these mistakes don't apply to my current situation."

That situation, investigators say, involves a hit-and-run accident last month that killed tow truck driver Roger Perez-Borroto on the northbound span of the Howard Frankland. 

Prosecutors say, instead of calling for help after she hit him, she went to Walgreens, called a cab, and then headed to the Seminole Hard Rock Casino.

Friends of the victim told she is trying to dodge responsibility for her actions.

"It's ridiculous," Lou Moralez offered.  "I just think it's a way to try and manipulate the situation like she has in the past to get everything reduced to a point that she could walk away."

The letter was apparently not persuasive.  The judge declined to reduce her bond, which remains set at $750,000.

She's due back in court next month.

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