Mobile food store helps customers and workers live better lives

- An old program with a new twist is helping to supply jobs for those with disabilities.

Chris Farrow loves his job with the Mobile Market Truck. The mobile grocery store brings low-cost, fresh fruit, vegetables, and nutritious foods to underserved areas.

"We get all this produce and food and we sell it to the people here," Farrow said. "I like to get out and help other people."

The program is a collaboration between Feeding Tampa Bay and Goodwill-Suncoast. They partnered to provide job training for adults with disabilities.

"It's really a win-win situation for us," said Matt Spence of feeding Tampa Bay. "Because we get to bring additional food out into the community to people who can use it."

The on-the-job training is part of Goodwill's Life Skills Development program. They help participants achieve greater independence and employment.

"They get certification in food handling [and] all kinds of different services, skills that can help them get employment," explained Jennifer Fleming with Goodwill Suncoast.

For Greg McIntyre, the job has practical meaning.

"What's good about working is you have money to pay bills, your phone, lights, electricity," McIntyre said.

Tressa Lozzia runs the program.

"We have had a couple of them that have gone out into the community and actually have jobs working in different grocery stores. Reorganizing shelves and it's been really good for them," Lozzia said.

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